Hotline: 555.555.1235

Dremel - 3D40-FLX-01 DigiLab 3D40 Flex 3D Printer with Filament, Flexible Build Plate, Fully Enclosed Housing, Automated 9...

4.7 23 reviews

USD1399

Details
DREMEL DIGILAB’S BEST VALUE PRINTER OPTION RELIABLE AND PRECISE PRINTING: 50 Micron layers (1/20th mm). Internally tested by Bosch (+800 hours) for safety and performance and 3rd party tested by UL WINDOWS, MACOS, CHROMEBOOK AND IPAD COMPATIBLE with cloud-based software included NETWORK FRIENDLY with Wi-Fi, Ethernet and USB connectivity. Also equipped with static IP and Proxy for quick and easy network set-up WORLD-CLASS LIFETIME DREMEL CUSTOMER SUPPORT located in Racine, WI. FLEXIBLE BUILD PLATE with ergonomic handles and magnetic Snap-On mechanism for easy and fast build plate and print removal AUTOMATED 9-POINT LEVELING SYSTEM and built-in auto-levelling sensor detects and account for discrepancies for more successful printing FULLY ENCLOSED HOUSING for quiet operation and improved print quality
Reviews
User says:

This is my second printer, the first being a printrbot from 2015. I wanted a printer that was user-friendly and made by a company that has been around for awhile. I'm using this printer for personal and school projects (mechanical engineer). I don't have a need for any special materials or super fine detailed prints. So far, I am very pleased with my printer. The menu on the printer holds your hand throughout set-up/calibration and I'm all for that. The flexible print bed is really easy to take out and put back in. It helps a lot with removing prints and will definitely save the bed tape, although it doesn't entirely remove the need to scrape. I also love the simple bed leveling, touchscreen menu, and clear doors to view prints in progress. My first print was the frog that came preloaded on the printer, I had forgotten to set the z offset, so the first layer was iffy and caused some other blemishes. After realizing my mistake, I went through the assisted calibration process and my next two prints came out perfectly. UPDATE(few days later): Since waiting for this review to get published, I printed out a tiny planetary gear set which involved a dozen or so very small prints. I found that the tiny gears print better with the .34 resolution rather than .1. I'm really impressed with how the finished product came out and thought I should share..

User says:

I will never buy any other printer! I started 3D printing using a Dremel 3D20model and traded that in for a 3D40 model when Dremel released that version.While I was absolutely pleased with the 3D20. I bought the 3D20 based on priceand research. I wasn't about to pay $3,000 dollars and up just to make items. Dremel made an affordable and easy to use 3D printer with the models that they have released. The printer is extremely easy to use, you do notneed a degree in CAD to start printing as they have partnered with Simplify 3Dwhich is a program that does magic with print files. The 3D40 is easy to levelas it is almost self leveling, by just adjusting 2 dials, and the printer willtell you when it's level. Filament is easy to load from the side of the machine.It evens stops printing when you run out of filament, and the printer willresume at the point it ran out. A nice feature to have when you're printing alarge model overnight.I now have 3 3D40 printers that I almost run 24 hours a day without any issues,other than normal wear and tear of parts. Dremel is AMERICAN MADE, and theirheadquarters and service department is located in Racine Wisconsin. The peoplein service are tremendous, knowledgeable, fast and efficient with any of the fewrepairs that I have needed.I print model tanks, cars, and trucks from the WW I era to current on the internet.Following is a review a customer just left for me:"Great piece!!!Very excited about the pieces I have ordered from this source. The pieces alwaysare packed great, look fantastic, as they are made to order every corner andfitting are terrific. The items always have a very realistic design, what elsecan I say. Tanks a lot! :-)"Dremel is the printer you need to buy to start your journey in the world of 3Dprinting.

User says:

I bought dremel to support my local Racine business. I am impressed with the prints. This can be used for prototyping. It was able to make 1/24th inch holes and 1/16 inch clean 180 degree channels. It is still going strong after 36 hour straight flawless print. The gold piece was build without support and at .3mm extrusion so fastest settings and holes were printed horizontally are 1/16. Precision is +- .002 inch at .1mm print, BUT I did not update the Dremel software. It would be nice to have dual extrudes for $1,200 dollars. This is 1/16 inch tubing, but PLA shrinks roughly 2%.

User says:

The Dremel 3D40 Flex is an amazing 3D printer! When it arrived, we started unboxing it and getting it set up. The unboxing took around 10 minutes, and it was really easy! After it was unboxed, it took around 15 minutes to set up the printer, to get it connected to WiFi, and to get the filament loaded.Once setup was complete, and the printer was ready to print, you could use the USB that came with the printer to start printing! Keep in mind, we were printing in less then 25 minutes! The USB was already preloaded with models, so if you wanted to print one of the models it came with, you could.The print quality on this printer is amazing! It is smooth and the layering is fantastic! Also to mention, the colored LCD is easy to use, and during the print, it shows how much time is left, and a picture of the model getting filled in! While it was printing, we did not smell any fumes from the filament due to it being a fully closed 3D printer, which is a huge plus. Also on the topic of it being fully closed, the doors actually have magnets, so they stay closed, and if you open the door while it is printing, it displays a warning, door open message on the screen.When the print is done, removing the flexible build plate is so easy, anyone could do it! Overall, the printer is quiet, has great lighting, makes amazing models, does not smell when printing, and most importantly, is easy to use!

User says:

We got this printer about a month ago. I checked out many different ones but decided to go with Dremel.I dint now anything about haw to 3d print. I was all new to that .and now I'm designing already my own gadgets and print them in 3d.like go pro attachments .There are many sites out there where you can get different 3d prints from designers and you easily can print.what I love about the printer , 10 min to set up and running. simple to use , my kids under 10years can use the printer. thats haw easy it is . (see the dinosaur they printed from thinkercad )Time will tell if this was the right printer for me and the family. but as off now im more than happy with it and its almost running daily prating toys ore other gadgets .my biggest fear was that im running out off filament, so I ordered 3 more rolls.and we printed a lot and we are still on the first roll white filament that came with the printer.the Dremel software makes it easy to to see haw long and haw many meters off filament it takes to print a object. the the rolls tell you on the side haw much is still on there.very happy with the printer

User says:

I received the Dremel 3D40 on Feb 14, unboxed, set up, added filament and started my first print in about 30 mins.I’m pretty tech savvy and it was a breeze, super easy. Should be easy for anyone of any level.I left the printer going overnight and in the morning I was treated to a perfectly printed dinosaur head!It’s now 3 days later and I have printed a dozen or so items, of varying degrees of difficulty and the printer is so easy to use and the slicing tool is simple, also.This is my first 3D printer and I would 100% recommend it to anyone!

User says:

Just completed several new prints with my new Dremel Digilab 3D40 3D Printer!Out of the box I had the device up and running within 30 minutes (After I read the instructions!)Printed out a few models from this site so I could test it out. Can't wait to start creatingVery easy to use and the print quality is great. Would highly recommend this to anyone in the market for a new printer.

User says:

I purchased the 3D40 for my classroom and so far it has been fantastic. Clean prints, low odor, and quick print times. Did I mention it's pretty quiet. I'll update my review after a couple of months but it's been great and easy to get started right out of the box. The Dremel brand filament is a little more expensive, but the quality is good.

User says:

Perfect results right out of the box. No assembly required, semi automatic bed leveling, touch screen and wifi. Technical service is USA based and a phone call away. I had a few questions and they answered all on the first call. Highly recommended and worth the price.

User says:

I bought this as my first 3D printer. The shipping with prime was fast and the printer is great. The software you download from the Dremel site is extremely user friendly and simple to use. I've been printing without stopping since I got it. I haven't had any real problems with the printer only problems that can be fixed with more experience and time issuing the printer because I am new to it. I guess the only real bad thing was it didn't come with the advertised black build tape which is supposed to be of better quality then the blue tape. I contacted customer support to see what can be done about that and I am waiting on a reply now. I'm giving this four stars until I hear back from them. I will update as so as I hear back from them.

User says:

[[VIDEOID:5d6f961a73ab649e6bd99fa53f08f13b]] A few things to consider on this Dremel 3D40 3D printer.This is a PLA printer not ABS so has no heated build plate.Whereas PLA is good for a variety of applications and quicker, it may not be as effective as an ABS for more complex projects. ABS projects can take more heat, pressure and stress than PLA, so are more suitable for projects that will undergo stress on moving parts in application. But they are also more susceptible to warping and cracking and require longer cool downs during the printing process.ABS will also distort and bend more easily and is less likely to break than PLA filament.ABS and PLA offer different advantages. PLA is easier and convenient to use and it is deemed safer than its counterpart. However, ABS is stronger and more flexible. You can print more things with ABS, but it is not as easy to handle.Also PLA is easier, and smells less during use.This Dremel is designed to use ONLY their own brand of filament, and carries a warning that using aftermarket or other brands will void any warranty.The touchscreen and menu system is very good and easy to use, and these printers are primarily aimed at the education market to so the learning curve is quite easy to follow.It has a semi auto leveling print bed where the servo arm dictates what is level and you finely adjust the blue knobs under the bed to make it exact. Early testing is promising with no leveling issues.Single extruder which is warrantied not to clog (as long as you are using their filament) and is very advanced hardware.Loading and unloading the filament is also very easy to do.Flash drive, Ethernet and Wi-Fi to download templates from your account on the Dremel website which is also good.If you have Autodesk print software, this Dremel is also compatible with that.Maximum build volume is 10” x 6” x 6.7”.Unit comes with a flash drive and some pre-loaded templates and files on internal storage.This model is $1299as tested (base model) and extra Filament spools will cost you about $30 each.There is great “education package” available for around $275 with extra filament and learning software if you are using this for education purposes.Overall I rated it 4 stars. It’s still crazy for an older person like me to believe this technology is out there at all, let alone available in your own home, and I think Dremel have done a great job with a good start up printer.

User says:

I'd been wanting a 3D printer for a while. I am no engineer so this is the view of a rookie. When this opportunity came up, I jumped at it. It was so simple to set up. Just unpack it, plug it in, run the setup and you are good to go. There are several built-in or pre-programmed designs. The first one I made was a frog- it took well over 2 hours to make. It came out with amazing detail. Then I made a bishop chess piece. It took 40 minutes and the tiny ball at the top looked terrible. It's just not capable of that detail.It came with a "flexpad" and two removable plastic plates. Before every printing, it created an outline of the design you intend to build and that is a bear to remove later. I'm not sure you should even try. The unit came with a metal putty knife but it did not come off no matter how I tried. I was able to print over it and it did not seem to affect subsequent designs so no big deal.Connecting it to my network so I could use it with the software on my computer was easy. There are many sites with lots of designs. You have different options regarding the strength or mass of the model- you can choose from a hollow shell (weakest) to a solid piece. in the middle are honeycomb designs. The more solid you make it the more filament you use, as expected. You can see it better in the software.Overall very happy with this device. I hope to finish my own model soon.

User says:

This was my first foray into at home 3D printing. We had a printer in college in my CAD class which at the time was larger than a telephone booth.Out of the box, this thing started printing within 15 minutes. Ran through the quick start guide and started printing a sample item. REALLY frustrating part is the software- still haven't been able to get their software installed or access it. I've filed tickets and contacted Dremel Chat support, to have no solution after 4 days.Print quality is good. Includes one spool of white PLA. Note their spools are different size and not for regular spools.

User says:

This little 3D printer is just what I needed for my classroom. Once I got it configured with our school internet, firmware updated, and all required software downloaded (all thanks to our crack tech department), it was a breeze to get started on making my first 3D something. I used Sketchup to create a "paperclip holder" (really just a simple box), sliced it using the Dremel Digilab 3D Slicer software, saved as GCODE and sent it over the wifi connection to the printer. I know my students will love this just as much as I do. Oh, and they also have a very knowledgeable, professional, and efficient tech support team that I had to email a couple of times to know what my tech guys needed to get it up and running. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!

User says:

Every student in our K-5 school drew a musical instrument. From the illustrations, the kids used computer software to digitally design the instruments. After that, 27 students were chosen to print their instrument on our Dremel 3D printer using the beautiful selection of PLA filament. The kids loved choosing from the spectacular colors! Thank you Dremel. Our art program is thriving.

User says:

The Idea Builder 1.0 from Dremel was a pretty stellar product when it was first released because it worked and it worked well out of the box. For may, myself included this was our first time using a 3D printer. The Idea Builder 1.0 was the first 3D printer produced by Dremel, and as such it certainly had its problems and annoyances. Dremel listened to the feedback from their customers, in fact at one point I logged a support ticket on their site and later that night I had a conference call with one of their engineers to discuss a clogging issue with the print head and other gripes and Dremel appears to have compiled the feedback from not only me but other Idea Builder 1.0 owners into what they are now calling the next generation of Idea Builders, the 2.0As an owner of the 1.0 and now the 2.0 I wanted to review the differences in these products and share my thoughts on them.First off the shipping of the 2.0 is similar to the 1.0, it comes very well packed inside an outer carton so you can have this shipped from Amazon to your home or office and no one will be the wiser what is inside. Simply remove the inner carton and you have the official Dremel box with full artwork. I will say the 1.0 did feature a nifty inner packing where when you removed the lid of the box the sides gave way and it was a display within the packaging which I liked, the 2.0 went for a simpler "box" approach which works just as well, just not as fancy.The printer is nestled between 2 cardboard sleeves, simply open the top of the box, remove the 2 plastic envelopes which hold power cord, usb cable, build platform, build tape, directions,a usb drive, plastic "removal tool" (a.k.a putty knife.), etc and then lift out the top cardboard sleeve. You then pick the printer up, it is wrapped in plastic, take the bag off of the printer and you'll have more packaging to remove. Peel away the blue tape and pull off the plastic covers from the acrylic top and doors, don't forget the tape on the left side holding the filament storage shut. Once done open the front door and gently raise the build platform with your hands and then the last 2 cardboard inserts pop right out, the last insert you'll remove holds the spool of filament. Overall packaging is very minimal but very secure.The printer has had some drastic changes from the 1.0. For instance the old printer had a lid that was Dremel blue in color and it lifted right off. The new lid is attached with hinges and is clear acrylic so you can see right into the printer, a pretty cool addition to ensure your printer remains protected yet visible. One thing I like is the hinges are not cheap, the lid will actually stay in an open position at almost any angle so it won't slam shut, a nice touch. It's also thick so it doesn't flex when you lift up on one side.The front door also saw an improvement and is MUCH larger than the 1.0 door. It also feels stronger in build quality and doesn't flex at all when opened. There is a magnetic closure on the right hand side, part of this magnetic closure is a sensor that tells the printer if the door is open or not, if it is open the printer will still function but it throws a warning message on the little control panel. In fact when you hook the printer up to your online dremel account the website will give you near realtime feedback when you try to send a print to it reminding you the door is open.One thing that I hated about the 1.0 was the filament path, on my printer the screw always comes loose and the filament channel would fall off causing the filament to jam or break, I would then have to reattach it and then run the filament and feed it into the head again. The new 2.0 does away with that model and uses a simple clear sleeve up the left side of the printer, then the filament goes from that right into the print head. Very easy, no points of failure to fall of or break causing jams.Now one significant thing Dremel did differently on the 2.0 is completely revamped the spool loading. In the old version you put the spool on a little plastic adapter inside the printer, for me this meant raising the build platform to the top, opening the door and trying to get the spool situated. Now this wasn't always easy but it worked. And while the original printers spool holder was build for Dremel spools fellow makers were able to upload a file where you could print a replacement spool holder that fit most 3rd party spools. On the 2.0 however that is no more. Spools are now loaded through a round cover on the left side of the printer, you turn the cover counter-clockwise just a little to unlock it and remove the door. Then feed the filament through the plastic tube and insert the spool onto the mount, put the door back on and finish threading the filament into the print head. Overall I like the design better but I am not sure if 3rd party filaments will fit this new spool holder, and since it is a massive upgrade, replacing the filament holder won't be easy, but replacing the spool will be. They do make external filament roll holders, you can also print your own that would sit next to the printer so there is a way around using the onboard holder if you needed/wanted to.Calibration of the old 1.0 meant sliding a tiny piece of paper between the build platform and the print head until it was the right amount of tension. This annoyed me and I burned/melted more than one leveling sheet in the process. The new 2.0 has an upgraded self leveling system, sure you still need to adjust the dials but the printer auto calibrates and then tells you what to do, and when you are done. If it senses it isn't level it tells you what dial to turn and then as you turn it you hear a victory beep letting you know you succeeded, simply press the confirm button and the printer double checks your work and you are ready to print.The new 2.0 also features one other major upgrade, WiFi and iOS and Android apps. I didn't test the iOS app but I did use the android and it is very slick. First off when you power the printer on it walks you through country selection and language followed by a EULA. Then it searches for your wifi and you use the touchscreen to enter your password. It's very intuitive. Once done you can download the app and register your printer, you do need to get a token from your printers settings menu to register the app but that is a few pushes on the touchscreen to generate that. After that you can link the account up to the dremel autocad app (all within the same app) and start printing directly from your phone, tablet or even computer wirelessly. I did test saving an STL file from thingverse and uploading it to my dremel account on their site and was able to to trigger a wireless print of an STL file I downloaded from another repository of files.My initial print was a traffic barrel followed by some sunglasses that say "SUSE" (linux) across the frame, I logged into the app, sorted by print time and found a 12 minute print item and hit the print button. Nothing happened, I realized when I looked at the status in the app it told me my printer door was open, I shut it and about 20 seconds later printing started. The overall build quality was really good considering I just unboxed it, loaded the filament and calibrated it. I didn't tweak any other settings and am very happy with how the build went. Later I printed a fully functional robot toy with hinges as well as a lighthouse that took over 6 hours to build with supports included, everything worked perfectly with no hiccups.On board in the internal memory there are the typical Dremel standard prints, a frog, chess pieces, a t-rex head, etc if you want some quick prints without any external app. They produce excellent results, in fact all of the prints I downloaded from Dremels site directly have been very successful, they seem to vet those designs very carefully and ensure they are optimized for their printers. 3rd party download sites do work as well, but those are the ones where your mileage may vary.Overall the enhancements on the 2.0 are really nice, I dare say "essential" and compared to the 1.0 this is my new go-to printer. The fact I can print wirelessly and have a build queue makes this so much more efficient. Mix that with the new acrylic doors, spool loading process and clog free print head (something 1.0 did NOT have) I really like these changes and it shows Dremel really listened to it's customers.I will add, one feature missing from this is the heated print bed. The 1.0 didn't have it either but other printers of comparable cost DO feature this. I have not needed that yet and all my builds on the 1.0 turned out good, and so far the initial prints on the 2.0 are even better. There are aftermarket heated beds you can install if you want that, perhaps Dremel will add that and a second filament spool and extruder on the next version. But for now I would say the enhancements on 2.0 make this a worthy contender.

User says:

[[VIDEOID:9feffe2083cdb993fce166add05f46da]] In short...If you are looking to get started in 3D printing with a consumer-level printer, and if you are willing to put up with a few setup issues, you should find yourself up and running on this Dremel printer in a reasonable amount of time. Roughly 15 minutes after unboxing, I was printing my first model. Thanks to the touchscreen interface and an included flash drive with several 3D models, I was able to print without even connecting to my computer. Connecting to my Windows 10 computer took more time than expected, but once I had the software and driver installed, and once I found some downloadable models on Dremel's site (models contributed by the community), I was able to print using my PC. I've included a video that pieces together several aspects of the printing process. If you've never watched a 3D printer in action, you might find it worth a look. Note that models can easily take hours to print. I printed a tiny hexagonal "vase" that took roughly five hours.Also, if you've never done any 3D printing before, consider this: There seems to be a lot more emphasis on printing models created by others than on creating your own models. The included 3D Print Studio software (well, not exactly included...it needs to be downloaded from Dremel's site) is about printing and not creating. There is nothing included with the printer to help you start creating your own models. This is not a complaint...just an observation. Creating 3D models has a learning curve. If you have a great idea for something you want to build, but have never used software to create such a model, you may find that your printer sits idle for a while until you learn to build things. In the meantime, there is a large collection of existing models that can be downloaded and printed.Some details about Dremel's 3D printer:* This is version 2.0 of the Idea Builder. I have also used their original "1.0" Idea Builder, and found that the newest version has a few nice improvements. Most notable, for me, was the process of leveling the platform before printing (a process that needs to be done every time the platform is removed and then put back in the printer). The process is mostly automated, as the platform is moved around, and the screen guides the user into which dials need to be turned.* I also like the improved connectivity options (USB, wired network, or Wi-Fi). I tested all three options, and all worked well. Using the touchscreen to enter my Wi-Fi password was a bit tedious, but reasonable.* Another change (hard to say if it's better or worse): Idea Builder 2.0 has a USB port for connecting a flash drive. If the flash drive contains 3D models, the printer can print them without connecting to a computer.* The quick start guide and instruction manual need to be easier to use. For example, the quick start guide says that the printer should be off when installing the filament. The operating/instructions book, on the other hand, says that the printer should be on. Also, the print platform is an essential part of the printing process, but the quick start guide never mentions attaching the platform to the printer. It skips that step, but then talks about how to level the platform. My advice: ditch the quick start guide. Go with the instruction manual because it seems to be more accurate.* The process for replacing a spool of filament is a bit different from 1.0, with a circular door on the printer's left side that needs to be twisted to open it. That little door is a little loud and clunky. Once opened, it is fairly easy to thread the filament through the supply tube, and over to the extruder. Touchscreen instructions walk you through the steps.* Getting the printer connected to my PC was a bit frustrating. Downloading the software required setting up an account. Once I got to the download page, there were instructions about some additional software that Windows 8 and 10 users would need in order to install the driver. That driver installation process did not work correctly because, apparently, the printer needs to be connected via USB in order to install the driver.Persistence will pay off. Once the 3D Print Studio is set up, and once the driver is installed, it was easy to browse 3D models online, download them, and send them to the printer. I don't mind a little hard work in getting devices to work with my computer. But just understand that there may be occasional hiccups in the process. If you are willing to put up with the quirky setup, the payoff comes quickly once you see your first model printing.

User says:

[[VIDEOID:5ab7767495a9e34b9f31b69403a74a3b]] The 3D40 Flex 3D print is my first 3D printer. It was easy to set up and bed leveling was extremely easy even for a beginner. It can be connected to the computer with WIFI, USB, or Ethernet. The flexible table makes part removal easy. I've used this printer more than I thought I would before I purchased it. I've been able to create things easily using free software. Dremel provides free slicing software, but I did opt to purchase Simply 3D, which has built-in defaults for my printer. My daughter now calls me a "Craft Geek."

User says:

We purchased our Dremel 3D printer last year when students raised money for it independently. They were very excited and none of us had any experience, so we all learned together. We used Tinkercad.com for our design program and 5th graders designed chess pieces. We printed about 60 pieces last year with only one major clog. This year, we ramped up production. We printed 75 Christmas tree ornaments as a fundraiser and are currently printing approximately 175 student pieces for the end of the year.The only issue we have had is with clogs. Customer service held my hand every step of the way as they helped me take the extruder completely apart to clear the clog. This is not for anyone who isn't very determined to 3D print. I have taken the machine apart about 10 times now. The only problem I am having is that the screws are getting stripped. Dremel offered to replace the extruder head one time for free. I have not taken them up on this yet as it is still a consistent workhorse.If you are determined to 3D print with students, this is a great machine. It is relatively quiet compared to my DaVinci that I have at home. I would recommend this machine for beginners with no experience and lots of passion.

User says:

Great printer. Printed over 400+ hours with a lot of weird prints and it consistently performed well, most reliable 3D printer we have ever used at this price point. Autodesk software works outstandingly great and makes parts accurately to the scale needed. Prints are fast, easy to feed filament and bed leveling is super easy.

User says:

Bought this for my middle school class, and it printed right out of the box. My personal printer is cheaper, but this is more automated and better for simplicity and ease of use. Solid build, only prints with PLA.

User says:

So far this 3D printer has been great and easy to use. It is very beginner-friendly and it cuts quietly. I have enjoyed playing around with it and designing cool objects. The only reason I rated it 4 out of 5 stars is because I've had to restart a few projects because the leveling was off a bit. Overall, this is a great 3d printer and I would purchase it again.

User says:

Compared to our old 3D printer [an Mbot], the Dremel is extremely easy to set up and use. My middle school kids have become quickly adept at using AutoDesk to edit their creations...most of which are fidget spinners of their own designs :)

similar items